Weekly Thursday Education News Round-Up – 31/01/2019

Education sector to host over 50% of workload in the cloud by 2020 – A survey by Nutanix suggests the sector will benefit from increased security and ease of management, as well as decreased total cost of ownership

Nutanix has announced the findings of its first ever global Enterprise Cloud Index, including education institutions’ plans for adopting private, hybrid and public clouds. The research, conducted by Vanson Bourne, found that 55% of educational institutions’ workloads will be running in the cloud by 2020, compared to 38% today.

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GDPR seven months on: what have we learnt? – VWV Partner, Andrew Gallie, and Senior Associate, Claire Hall, look at the key data protection issues following GDPR

At VWV, we look at the key data protection issues we have been advising schools on since the new data protection regime came into force in May.

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‘Managers are no use without skilled workers’ – The increase in the number of management apprenticeships is exacerbating societal divides, writes Yvonne Williams

At first glance, the apprenticeship starts figures from the most recent reports look encouraging. But, as always, looks can be deceiving. – What is of most concern is the configuration of the starts and the direction in which the funding is travelling.

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Nine in ten schools struggle to recruit EBacc teachers, and eight other findings from the DfE’s school snapshot survey

The results of a large-scale survey of teachers and leavers reveal problems with key government policies such as the EBacc and efforts to cut workload.

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Government must prioritise and invest in training for low-skilled workers, social mobility commission says – High-skilled workers benefit from a ‘virtuous circle’ of in-work training and pay rises, report finds

The government and employers must do more to prioritise and invest in training for low-skilled workers, the Social Mobility Commission has urged. – The poorest adults with the lowest qualifications, especially men in routine and manual jobs, are the least likely to learn new skills, according to research carried out for the advisory body.

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T Level Capital Fund open for bids – Providers aiming to deliver T levels can apply for government funding to build new facilities or refurbish existing ones

Colleges keen to upgrade their facilities in the run-up to delivering the new T levels can now bid for money from a new government fund.

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Pupils won’t lose SATs marks for back-to-front commas, DfE tells primary heads

Primary school pupils will no longer lose marks if they write a comma back-to-front, the government has told headteachers after an outcry over the way SATs were marked two years ago.

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‘Unconditional’ offers rise from 3,000 to 11,700 in 5 years – New research conducted by the Office for Students reveals worrying research on the impact of a growing trend for unconditional offers

We are concerned about the rapid rise in unconditional offers, particularly those with strings attached which are akin to pressure selling – Nicola Dandridge, chief executive, Office for Students

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Not enough time for innovation, say teachers – Bett statistics show two thirds of teachers spend most of their time on policy changes

New stats released at Bett last week reveal 65% of teachers spend the majority of their time on policy changes, leaving little time for innovation. – The research, commissioned by Bett and carried out by independent research agency Shift Learning, found that aspects of classroom innovation have declined, due to the amount of time taken up by curriculum and assessment changes.

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£17,500 up for grabs from edtech competition – The Cool Initiatives Education Challenge is aiming to find the next big innovation in edtech

Edtech investor Cool Initiatives has launched The Cool Initiatives Education Challenge 2019, offering a total of £17,500 in prizes to students, teachers, or early-stage start-ups that offer an edtech solution that could conceivably change education as we know it.

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Schools may be allowed to build homes for teachers – DfE recruitment and retention strategy says planning rules could be relaxed to allow new homes on surplus school land

The government could change planning regulations to make it easier for schools to build housing for teachers on surplus land. – The proposal is included in the Department for Education’s flagship Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategy, published today.

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Revealed: The 11 schools picked to lead £2.4m curriculum fund programme pilots

Eleven academies have been selected to lead trials of the government’s new curriculum fund programme.

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Private school bursaries are being used to top up fees of middle class children, leading head says

Dr Anthony Wallersteiner, head of the £36,000-a-year Stowe School in Buckinghamshire, said independent schools were not doing enough to reach out to children from deprived households. – He said a large proportion of bursaries were handed out to the “squeezed middle” – children of doctors, lawyers and owners of small businesses – who can no longer afford to pay fees in full.

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Universities making unconditional offers may be breaking law by ‘pressure selling’ to students

Universities making unconditional offers may be breaking the law by “pressure selling”’ to students, the higher education watchdog has warned.

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Heads ‘should challenge each other’ to end off-rolling – President of Chartered College says new ethical framework could help schools work together to prevent pupils being excluded.

Local school leaders need to work together and challenge each other to end off-rolling, a leading head has said. – Stephen Munday, president of the Chartered College of Teaching, spoke ahead of tomorrow’s launch of a new code which aims to tackle such problems.

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School league tables: The best and worst-performing MATs, and other findings

New figures published by the government today reveal how well the country’s multi-academy trusts are performing.

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Three steps to managing the behaviour of pupils with SEND – It needs a balance of understanding the reasons for behaviour and ensuring it is properly dealt with, argues this teacher

A teacher friend told me a story the other day: a Year 3 pupil was disrupting lessons by climbing on tables and an educational psychologist visited the school to offer some advice on how to manage the situation. The psychologist suggested that the pupil was suffering from low self-esteem and as a result was resorting to physically elevating themselves to make them feel better emotionally.

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Ofsted to research how schools spend their money – But Amanda Spielman repeats controversial claim that there’s no evidence of a link between reduced budgets and standards

Ofsted chief inspector Amanda Spielman says her inspectors will carry out research into how schools spend their money. – The pledge came in response to a recommendation from the Commons Public Accounts Committee that she give her views on the causes of poor school performance, including the impact of funding pressures.

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School funding crisis ‘leading to cheaper edtech’ – Edtech pioneer says price rises in England are lower than in the US owing to tight budgets and the number of companies in the market

The funding squeeze on schools in England is forcing edtech companies to keep the prices of their products down, a pioneer in the sector has said. – The news comes a day after education secretary Damian Hinds used a speech at the Bett edtech show to hail a new scheme that will see more than 100 edtech firms allowing schools to trial their products before deciding whether to spend any money on them.

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Council funds for libraries, museums and galleries cut by nearly £400m over eight years, figures reveal – Exclusive: Council leaders warn funding pressures leave them ‘between rock and hard place’

Libraries, museums and art galleries across England have had their funding slashed by nearly £400m in the past eight years, forcing hundreds to close, The Independent can reveal. – Leaders of county councils, which are mainly Conservative-run, say spending cuts have been made to the arts and education to ensure there is enough funding to provide care for the elderly and the vulnerable.

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Posted in Education News, Weekly Blog.