Weekly Thursday Education News Round-Up – 20/12/2018

Government names first 25 areas to get school ‘mental health support teams’

The Department for Education and Department of Health have named the “trailblazer” areas for the new teams, which will work with around 8,000 children and up to 20 schools each from late 2019.

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Do we hide the truth about behaviour from parents in primary? – Many parents never know how disruptive their child is in class, says Lisa Jarmin, who offers five tips on telling them

It’s 10.30am and you have a headache brewing. You’ve already gone three rounds with the class smart-arse who makes rudeness into an art form; the queen bee has been attempting to divide and conquer via some next-level bitchiness; and your numeracy warm-up was like a game of musical chairs because you had to move the disruptive chatterbox so many times.

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The 38 MATs ‘below average’ for poorer pupils – New Sutton Trust research highlights the academy trusts where disadvantaged pupils perform below the national average

A new report has named 38 academy chains that were last year below the national average for the performance of disadvantaged pupils. – Chain Effects 2018, published by the Sutton Trust today, compares the average scores for disadvantaged (pupil premium) pupils in 58 academy chains with the national average for disadvantaged pupils.

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‘Why won’t Ofsted admit that pupil background can hinder schools?’Ofsted’s failure to admit the link between results and home background is damaging schools, warns William Stewart

A national newspaper has just published a list shaming England’s “worst” 364 primaries. – These schools had actually missed a Department for Education floor standard, heavily dependent on raw test results, which took only limited account of the context they work in.

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Check ‘consistency’ when considering reviews of coursework marking, schools told

Schools that receive requests to review coursework marks will have to judge whether their teachers are marking all pupils’s work consistently before submitting data to exam boards, under new rules proposed by Ofqual.

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Schools to get £350m extra SEND funding, but heads warn it’s ‘not enough’

The government will hand councils an extra £350 million in funding to support pupils with special educational needs and disabilities, after ministers caved to pressure from desperate school leaders.

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Policy Exchange: Deny top Ofsted grades to schools that fail to demand good behaviour

Schools should only be rated ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’ if they demand “higher standards of behaviour” from their pupils, the right-leaning think tank Policy Exchange has said.

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Need to know: Are nearly half of GCSE and A-level grades wrong? – Critics claim new Ofqual research shows that up to 40 per cent of grades are incorrect – but is that really the case?

Last month Ofqual published new research on marking consistency in public exams. The research provoked headlines suggesting that up to 40 per cent of grades that are being awarded are “wrong”. But what did the research actually say, and is that claim correct?

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Three rules that teachers need to break – There’s nothing wrong with working hard, but if your job is all you do, then it’s all you’ll be, says teacher Jo Steer

A few years back, I was perusing the cleverly situated bookshelves at Manchester Airport, full of pre-holiday excitement, when I spotted a book that I had to have. Richard Templar’s The Rules to Break appealed to my inner rebel (yes, kids, we break rules too), along with my need to create a life-changing epiphany of some kind each time I go on holiday.

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Disruptive behaviour ‘endemic in schools’, teacher survey warns – Seven in 10 teachers know a colleague who has quit because of pupil behaviour

Persistent disruption is “endemic in English schools” according to new research, which shows the majority of teachers know a colleague who has left the profession because of poor pupil behaviour.

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DfE rejects 7,000 requests by schools to wipe pupils’ GCSE scores

The government has refused nearly 7,000 requests from schools for their pupils’ GCSE scores to be wiped from league tables after applications rocketed following the introduction of Progress 8.

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Can earlier intervention help children deal with anger? – It is crucial for their development that we support kids as they make their way through the real and online worlds, says 1decision’s Hayley Sherwood

As we approach the season of goodwill, National Anger Awareness Week (December 1-7) is well-placed to shine a light on anger as a social issue which needs to be brought out into the open and addressed effectively.

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Blood cancer charity calls for compulsory health education – The move could boost the UK stem cell register by 55,000 a year, says the Anthony Nolan charity, giving hope to people in urgent need

Education about stem cell donation, used to treat patients with blood cancers and blood disorders, could see an additional 55,000 young people a year join the UK stem cell register, the charity Anthony Nolan has revealed.

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Education’s crisis needs teacher status ‘revolution’, says Gordon Brown – Former prime minister and UN envoy calls for four revolutions to solve the global education ’emergency’

Gordon Brown has set out four revolutions he believes are needed to secure a good quality primary and secondary education for every child in the world by 2030.

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DfE abandons Easter holiday hunger pilot after summer trial

The government will spend another £9 million testing solutions to holiday hunger across England, but has abandoned plans to run a pilot in the Easter and summer holidays next year.

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Most MATs ‘won’t be assessed by Ofsted’ – Inspectorate says it could focus on multi-academy trusts with strong- or weak-performing academies

The majority of multi-academy trusts will not be assessed under Ofsted’s new plans to use school inspection to look at their work. – Ofsted is planning to carry out new summary evaluations of MATs by inspecting groups of their schools over one or two terms and then discussing their findings with trust leaders.

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Access to higher education: Unlocking the potential of a new generation

When former Education Secretary Justine Greening MP addressed the Social Mobility Commission Conference in March 2017, she made it clear that social mobility was a “noble aspiration” for any government. Acknowledging that we all wanted a “fairer, more cohesive country… and for people to have the chance to be able to succeed”.

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Majority of university staff want more technology for teaching, finds report – Jisc’s survey of almost 2,000 lecturers found that 61% see themselves as among the first or early adopters of digital teaching tech

A survey of nearly 2,000 higher (HE) and further education (FE) teachers shows that 61% of university lecturers feel technology should be used more in the classroom. Despite this, 14% say they are never supported in developing their digital teaching skills.

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Posted in Education News, Weekly Blog.