Weekly Thursday Education News Round-Up – 13/12/2018

‘Don’t diss private schools over Oxbridge entries’ – All schools – regardless of sector – should ask if they are doing enough to get pupils into Oxbridge, argues this head

Independent schools will spend time and resources on the university application process, but surely it is the responsibility of all schools to prepare pupils for entry to their chosen university, including encouraging our brightest to aspire to the best universities in the country?

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Education Secretary backs system to flag university students’ mental health problems to parents

The Education Secretary has backed a system to flag university students’ mental health problems to parents. Damian Hinds has urged vice-Chancellors to “get better at reaching out to family members” if a student is struggling, adding that this would be a “big step” towards improving pastoral care.

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High Court judge warns over future of Ofsted inspections – Ofsted at Court of Appeal in bid to overturn judge’s decision to quash Durand Academy’s damning Ofsted report

There are “concerns for future Ofsted inspections” if the decision by a High Court judge to quash a school’s damning report is allowed to stand, a senior judge has said.

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T levels: Second wave of subjects announced – T levels will be worth ‘the same Ucas points as three A levels’, education secretary Damian Hinds will announce

The second wave of T-level programmes, which will be taught from 2021, have been announced. The first T levels, in education, construction and digital, will be introduced into around 50 FE providers and schools from September 2020. In a major speech on technical education today, education secretary Damian Hinds will unveil the next set of courses to be introduced the following year.

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More than half of UK students risk running out of money before next loan payment – Research by Campus Living Villages reveals that 56% of students are regularly left with little money

In light of its research that students risk running out of money before their January loan payment, student accommodation provider Campus Living Villages has announced a new partnership with financial literacy charity MyBnk to help its residents manage their money better.

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Number of year 13s re-taking English and maths GCSEs in November doubles

Tens of thousands of sixth form pupils were forced to wait an extra year before resitting their English and maths GCSEs because of reforms to the qualifications, it has been revealed.

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Fall in the number of young UK NEETs – While the news from the ONS is welcome, teachers remain concerned about pupils leaving school with insufficient employability skills

The number of young people not in education, employment or training (NEETs) in the UK is falling, according to newly released data from the Office for National Statistics.

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Number of schools in deficit at 9-year high – Almost a third of secondaries are now in the red, according to official statistics

The number of schools in deficit has hit its highest point in almost a decade, according to new statistics which reveal the growing budgetary pressures on England’s education system.

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‘This is about social mobility’: Academy trust boss defends exclusions record

The boss of an academy trust under the spotlight for high rates of temporary exclusions has insisted strict behaviour expectations “prevent chaos” in its challenging schools.

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Misbehaving children could be made to wear hi-vis and do ‘community service’ under school proposal

A secondary school is considering making misbehaving children wear green bibs and pick up litter as part of a “community service” punishment instead of detention.

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Just 8 top schools; win more Oxbridge places than 2,900 others – Independent school pupils are seven times more likely to go to Oxbridge, according to new research

Eight “top schools” sent more pupils to Oxbridge over three years than another 2,894 schools in England put together, a report published today reveals. The report Access to Advantage from the social mobility charity the Sutton Trust, analyses Ucas data university on acceptance rates by school type and region to show how access to university varies across England.

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Who is Chris Skidmore? Everything you need to know about the new universities and science minister

Chris Skidmore has been appointed the government’s new universities and science minister after his predecessor resigned over the prime minister’s Brexit plan. Mr Skidmore, the Conservative MP for Kingswood, in south Gloucestershire, replaces Sam Gyimah who quit last week.

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The three things dyslexic pupils want from their teacher. Based on student interviews, this is what dyslexic pupils said would be most helpful to them in the classroom

If you could ask your teachers to do one thing to help you, what would it be? This was my final question in a number of interviews with children and teenagers who had dyslexia. What was cheering about their answers was that what they needed was simple to provide. What was very dispiriting was that these simple strategies were very often ignored, forgotten or not communicated to new and supply staff.

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ESFA names 9 organisations to roll out £2.3m cost-cutting consultant expansion

The government has named the nine organisations that will recruit and manage a new raft of cost-cutting consultants to help schools save money.

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New DfE research shows ‘lasting negative impact’ on attainment of children in need

Pupils known to social services lag far behind their less vulnerable peers at GCSE, even if they are no longer classed as being “in need”, the Department for Education has warned.

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DfE to advise teachers on how to speak to vulnerable pupils

Teachers will get advice on “adapting how they speak” to pupils who have been in contact with social services as part of a government review.

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‘The education system is on the brink of collapse’- Amid the many problems facing schools, the one that could break the camel’s back is pension contributions, says one head

There hasn’t been much discussion about education on the political circuit broadly for some time now. The reason is obvious – the “B” word. But while our country engulfs itself in bitter, self-centered nonsense that separates us from our allies, our education system is about to collapse. This is no exaggeration.

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Teachers biased against black pupils and white boys from underprivileged backgrounds, report says – Biases affect setting, teacher assessment outcomes, and disciplinary measures in schools, report concludes

Teachers in London are biased against black Caribbean and white boys from poorer backgrounds, new research suggests. Education think tank LKMco is calling for urgent steps to be taken to tackle the impact of social inequality on the two groups’ academic achievements. Unconscious prejudices affect the way they are disciplined at school, how their work is assessed, and the academic ability set that they are put in, its study found.

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One in seven pupils starts secondary school lonely – Children say that transitions linked to schooling can trigger loneliness

Almost one in every seven British children starting their secondary school careers feels lonely “often”, new figures show. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) states that 14 per cent of children aged 10-12 say they often feel lonely. The total reduces to 8.6 per cent for those aged 13-15, the figures show.

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Posted in Education News, Weekly Blog.