Weekly Thursday Education News Round-Up – 10/01/2019

Why is school uniform still successful in 2019?

School uniform is an issue that has been debated for decades, if not centuries. Natalie Trice has been looking at the positive impact school uniform can have on students and schools, and why this tradition is still popular today.

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Five trends for education in 2019

Drawing on its experience of teaching over 53,000 pupils in 56 schools in 27 different countries, Nord Anglia Education has pulled together the trends most likely to impact teaching and learning over the next 12 months. Each are linked by a growing need for schools to better prepare pupils for an uncertain future.

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A new year’s resolution? Bring your friends closer – In uncertain times for further education, it is important to stay close and share experiences, writes Julia Belgutay

I am not a fan of New Year’s Eve. While Christmas, to me, is full of lights and excitement and optimism, I tend to view New Year’s Eve as much more of a day for reflection with a tinge of sadness for the opportunities missed in the past year.

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Students punished with thousands of fines totalling more than half a million, figures show -‘Universities should not be using exorbitant fines as a top-up fee’

Cash-strapped students have been hit with thousands of punitive fines by universities – totalling more than half a million pounds – at a time when graduates face £50,000 of debt, The Independent can reveal.

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Schools urged to eliminate single-use plastic by 2022 – One headmaster is urging parents not to wrap sandwiches in cling film

Schools are being urged to stop using single-use plastic by 2022 in an effort to combat plastic pollution. They’ll be encouraged to replace plastic products such as carrier bags, straws and food containers with sustainable alternatives.

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Two in three academy chains ‘fail’ poorer pupils, study finds – ‘Low-performing chains may be harming the prospects of disadvantaged students’

Two in three academy chains are “failing” pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds, a damning study suggests. Poorer children in 38 of the 58 academy chains performed below the national average last year for all state schools, according to research from social mobility charity the Sutton Trust.

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Conversation beats word count in child language development – Research finds a connection between ‘conversational turns’ of 18- to 24-month-olds and language skills a decade later

Young children’s verbal interactions with adults have a bigger impact on their language development than the number of words they hear, academics have found.

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How to ensure your HE institution is making the most of cloud resources

In the last decade, the UK education sector has seen the rise of several technologies. While many IT departments are accommodating new applications within their existing architecture, they are also trying to meet growing demands for capacity and protection.

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Two in five people think they would be a good teacher but low pay and workload deters them, unions say

Nearly half of us believe we would make a good teacher, a survey has found – but many of those interested in taking up the profession are just not entering classrooms.

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New website launches to promote FE research – The Networking the Networks project aims to ‘enhance the impact of research in and about the FE and skills sector’

A new website has been launched to promote research in and about the further education sector. More than 20 organisations involved in FE research have joined the Networking the Networks project to date.

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DfE finally admits teacher supply has ‘worsened’ Union accuses DfE of trying to put ‘positive spin on its lamentable record over teacher recruitment’

The Department for Education’s concern about teacher shortages has been laid bare in a private email seen by Tes. Unions have now called on the DfE to “come clean” and publicly admit the severity of the situation following the email in which it states:

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The school where pupils fly to swimming lessons -There is no pool on Fair Isle – the UK’s most remote inhabited island – so pupils have to take a plane to learn to swim

They live on an island surrounded by water but in order to learn to swim the three children who go to school on Fair Isle – the most remote inhabited island in the UK, located 25 miles south of Shetland – have to take a 25-minute flight.

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Study suggests iGCSEs are ‘easier’ than reformed GCSEs

Controversial international GCSEs used disproportionately by private schools are “easier” than new reformed GCSEs, a new study suggests.

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Need to know: What is the fourth industrial revolution? – Schools and teachers are set to be at the frontline of preparing pupils for the new digital age

MPs on the Commons Education Select Committee will tomorrow hear from edtech experts as part of their inquiry into the fourth industrial revolution. But what is the fourth industrial revolution, and what does it mean for teachers and schools? Here is what you need to know.

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Mock exams: How to cut the workload – Marking and moderating mock exams can be a lengthy process, but leaders can lessen the burden says Rebecca Foster

It’s fair to say that there’s probably never a good time to have to mark mock papers. That said, in lots of schools there seems to be some kind of sadist who calendars mock exams at particularly cruel times.

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Divert students from university to FE, says report – Boosting technical education could deliver economic returns for the Treasury and students alike, thinktank says

Students should be encouraged on to technical education courses at colleges, rather than university degrees with low economic returns, a new report suggests.

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Some pupils may not access new school mental health services for a decade

A government scheme to improve access to mental health services for pupils may not reach all schools for a decade, it has been admitted.

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Universities spending millions to ensure budget-strapped police forces still patrol on campus

Universities across Britain are paying the police to protect their students from crime. More than £2m has been paid out to 17 police forces over the last three years by 27 universities, and a further £1.2m allocated to current academic year. The figures were unearthed after freedom of information request by The Times.

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Schools need cash to replace crumbling tech infrastructure, MPs told

Schools in England forced to use eight-year-old computers need a one-off capital cash injection to “level the playing field”, education technology experts have told MPs.

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Fears over funding for introduction of T levels – Both the ‘challenging’ timescale and funding levels for the introduction of T levels are concerns for trade unions

The level of funding for the introduction of T levels, and a challenging timescale for implementation, are major concerns for trade unions, MPs have been told.

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T levels: What subjects can you take? The Institute for Apprenticeships has revealed the 25 subjects students will be able to study for a T level

By September 2023, school leavers will be able to take T levels in 25 subjects. The reforms to technical qualifications were first announced by chancellor of the exchequer Philip Hammond in the 2017 Spring Budget as part of a wider series of measures stemming from the government’s Post-16 Skills Plan.

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Schools failing to publicise A-level alternatives – Call for Ofsted action as report claims schools aren’t enabling FE providers to tell pupils about their offering

Schools are failing in their duty to enable further education providers to tell pupils about alternatives to A levels, research suggests.

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Posted in Education News, Weekly Blog.